The new family housing development where mortgages are just £54 a week

By Grimsby Telegraph | Posted: 11 Oct 2018

A new 60 home development has been approved in Immingham, that has been designed for the use of young families and couples with mortgages starting at just £54 per week.

The huge new development will be located on the site of the former Immingham Resource Centre on Margaret Street, and created by developers Gleeson Homes, who intend to create homes that a couple earning the minimum wage would easily afford.

The site will be a mix of two bedroom semi-detached and detached properties, and is a short distance from local schools and shopping facilities.

Speaking on behalf of Gleeson Homes, Matt Smith said: "We are looking to build 60 low cost affordable houses, that would provide a brilliant starting point for low-income families and couples to get themselves a home.


Immingham Resource Centre, Margaret Street.

"We are aiming to keep the prices as low as possible in the two to three bed entry range, that should be easily afforded by 90 per cent of working people.

"The starting mortgage would be £76,000, so that the average couple would only have to pay £54 per week, which is significantly cheaper than renting.

We are hoping that the development will be able to start within the next six months if approved, and we plan to use as many local people as possible in the construction process, as well as investing in local community groups such as sports teams.

"We also have a condition that we will not be selling to private landlords so that the properties can be rented out."

The planning application was originally submitted for 116 homes on the site and met strong objections from nearby residents and the town council. However, following further consultation with local stakeholders, the development was reduced in size and housing positions altered so that they would not look onto neighbouring properties.


The development will be build on the site of the former Immingham Resource Centre (Image: Jon Corken)

Despite these alterations residents have still objected to the amended application saying that the construction of the development will increase traffic on Margaret Street, making it dangerous for residents.

Barry Howard objected to the application saying: "The reduction to sixty dwellings does nothing to satisfy the objections of many residents in the area and along Margaret Street.

"We are all very concerned about Margaret Street congestion and accident potential. Accident potential is a particular concern in the area outside Eastfield Primary School at school peak periods."

Speaking at meeting of the North East Lincolnshire Council Planning Committee, councillor Tim Mickleburgh praised the application for finally making use of a brownfield site, instead of wanting to build on open countryside.


Site location plan for the 60 home development that has been approved in Immingham

He said: "We see so many applications that are wanting to build on countryside, so a scheme where a brownfield site is being used is brilliant and will it will be great to see regeneration in the town."

Councillor Stephen Harness sympathised with the objectors to the application, however felt that traffic problems near a school are common across the borough and not unique to this area.

Councillor Ros James praised the development saying that she liked how a clause was implemented saying that the homes would not be for the purpose of "buying to let."

She said: "The fact that this is on a brownfield site is a bonus, I don't know what would happen if this site wasn't regenerated. It would most likely become a tipping ground."

The Planning Committee approved plans for the development unanimously.



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